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 The Guardian News – Friday December 27, 2013 (originally published 18 Dec)

Amy McQuire

This week on @IndigenousX: Amy McQuire.ai

Each week, a new guest hosts the @IndigenousX Twitter account to discuss topics of interest as Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people. In partnership with IndigenousX, we’re inviting its weekly host to tell us about who they are, what issues they’re passionate about, and what they have in store for us during their upcoming week.

Tell us about yourself. Who are you, where are you from, what do you do?

My name is Amy McQuire and I’m Darumbal and South Sea Islander. I grew up in Rockhampton in Central Queensland but have called Canberra home for the past six years, not counting a brief sojourn to Sydney.

I’m currently editor of Tracker Magazine, an Aboriginal rights-based publication published by the NSW Aboriginal Land Council. Previously I worked at the National Indigenous Times, and NITV News as a political correspondent. I’m passionate about developing a strong Indigenous media sector through my work at Tracker and my role on the board of the Australian Indigenous Communications Association (AICA), the peak body for Indigenous media.

What do you plan to talk about on @IndigenousX this week?

I’m hoping to promote a film I believe every Australian should see –Utopia by John Pilger. There is a big, gaping hole in the Australian media landscape for Pilger’s style of journalism. This film pulls no punches: it is the hard-hitting truth about the two worlds in this country – one for black and one for white. The underlying question is how could a nation so rich, be so complacent about their first peoples, who are still mired in poverty?. . .

. . . read complete article . . .