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Patrick Hinds – Advocate.com – Friday, 26 July 2013 (originally published 22 Jul)

Women and men stand together in Stand with Women rally

Image: Advocate.com

LGBT history overflows with stories of women who have come to the aide of gay men: the concerned mother who founded PFLAG, the doctor who proved that homosexuality was not a pathological illness, the popular 1960s communist who wrote that gays and lesbians were born that way and should be true to themselves in order to find happiness, and the countless number of lesbians who, after years of feeling excluded from the gay liberation movement by their gay brothers, put aside their frustrations to care for them at the height of the AIDS epidemic when hospitals wouldn’t.

These are just a handful of the famous examples. It leaves out the sisters who defended us against bullies, the best girlfriends we came out to and took to the prom, and the mothers who handled our fathers who didn’t always know the right way to say they love us.

This history begs a question that nobody seems to be asking: If women have stood and fought alongside gay men in some of our darkest, toughest, hardest won battles, why are most gay men paying so little attention to the vicious war currently being waged against women: the attack on their constitutional right to a safe and legal abortion. The cynical, but probably true, answer is that gay men are apathetic toward the fight because we don’t feel a connection to it. While we feel a sense of indebtedness to the many women who have had our backs over the decades, gay men simply seem to feel that this fight doesn’t concern us . . .

. . . read complete article . . .

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