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Michael Kaufman and Gary Barker – The Guardian News – Monday 25 November, 2013

Brazil boy football

‘In Rio de Janeiro, nonprofit group Promundo uses football leagues to engage men of all ages in discussions about ending violence against women.’ Image: Vanderlei Almeida/AFP/Getty Images

It may seem foolish to be optimistic on 25 November, the International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women. The World Health Organization affirms that one in three women will experience violence from a male partner. A recent UN study in a half-dozen Asian countries finds that one in four men have raped.

Our optimism stems from an extraordinary change across the globe: more and more men are finally joining women to say all forms of violence against women must end. Even more critically, men around the world are saying we must play a key role in creating a future without violence against women.

Men have joined women in India, Africa and the Middle East to protest highly publicized crimes against women; in Europe and the Americas, they increasingly speak out. Together with women, we are calling on governments to take action and uphold the laws. The news from the UK that Clare’s law will now cover all of England and Wales is one example of a victory in this fight. We hope there will be many more of this kind.

The challenge now is to go even further. Yes, protests and marches raise attention. And, yes, arresting men and holding them accountable is key. But neither is enough. . .

 

. . . read complete article . . .

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