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Diana Pearl – Marie Claire – Monday, 25 August 2014 (originally published 18 Aug)

circa 1913:  From left to right, Inez Haynes Gillmore, Hildegarde Hawthorne, Edith Ellis Furness, Rose Young, Katherine Licily and Sally Splint represent female authors, dramatists and editors on a New York Women's Suffrage Parade.  Image: Paul Thompson/Topical Press Agency/Getty Images

circa 1913: From left to right, Inez Haynes Gillmore, Hildegarde Hawthorne, Edith Ellis Furness, Rose Young, Katherine Licily and Sally Splint represent female authors, dramatists and editors on a New York Women’s Suffrage Parade. Image: Paul Thompson/Topical Press Agency/Getty Images

The year 1920 marked the dawn of a new era of freedom for women—the year saw the ratification of the 19th amendment, which gave us the right to vote—it also ushered in a new decade of social liberation. But even as progressive as flappers and shorter hemlines were, women’s rights then were still laughable compared to the condition of women’s rights today. Even now, when hashtags like #WomenAgainstFeminism are trending topics, it’s important to remember that the women’s rights movement brought us the most basic of rights. And while we’re still fighting for equality, these were the norms for women back in the ’20s:

1. Most married at a very young age. In 2010, the average age of for a woman to get married was 26. Back in 1920, the year the 19th Amendment was ratified, the average bride was just 21 years old.

2. Women were having children at a much younger age, too.Even in the 1950s, the average age for the birth of a woman’s first child was just 22. That means that half of all American women were mothers before their 22nd birthday, and were therefore shuffled into a life of motherhood and homemaking before they had a chance to think about what they wanted to do with their lives . . .

. . . read complete article . . .

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